MIT Events

Showing: March 2017

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  • Special Seminar: Donald Paul (USC...
    11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    54-209
    Bring your curiosity and your career questions about the oil industry for an informal seminar with EAPS alum Donald Paul in the Earth Resources Lab. Donald Paul is the Executive Director of the USC Energy Institute, Professor of Engineering, and holds the William M. Keck Chair of Energy Resources at the University of Southern California. Dr. Paul had a distinguished 33-year career with the Chevron Corporation, retiring in June 2008 as Vice President and Chief Technology Officer. During his career, he advanced through positions of increasing responsibility in research and technology development, exploration and production operations, and executive management, including appointment as the president of Chevron's Canadian subsidiary. Dr. Paul currently serves as a Senior Advisor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington D.C. and in 2014, was re-appointed by the U.S. Secretary of Energy to the National Petroleum Council. He participates in advisory roles at several universities (including MIT), governments, national laboratories, oil and gas companies, utilities, technology companies, and venture capital firms. He is frequently recruited to speak at national and international forums on the future of energy, the security of energy systems, intelligent energy infrastructures, and energy careers. EVENT WEBSITE
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  • The impact of decarbonization policies...
    4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
    66-110
    In this seminar, Professor John Deutch introduces a simple model of an electricity market with competing nuclear, renewable, and natural gas generation to explore the operating characteristics that result from the imposition of five alternative policies intended to reduce CO2 emissions and/or increase renewable generation. He uses a static equilibrium analysis of supply and demand to compare the operating characteristics of an electricity system from the imposition of each new policy measure; the range of CO2 emission reductions proves to be surprisingly large. Given the values of the parameters assumed, Deutch finds it is unlikely that replacing a renewable portfolio standard by a carbon-free portfolio standard would be sufficient to encourage deployment of new nuclear electricity generation.
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